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Stem cells involved in replenishing human tissues and blood depend on an enzyme known as telomerase to continue working throughout our lives. When telomerase malfunctions, it can lead to both cancer and premature aging conditions. Roughly 90% of cancer cells require inappropriate telomerase activity to survive.

In a groundbreaking new study, an interdisciplinary team of Michigan State University researchers has observed telomerase activity at a single-molecule level with unprecedented precision ­­­­– expanding our understanding of the vital enzyme and progressing toward better cancer treatments.

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Jeff Mackeigan

Michigan State University has unveiled a new website highlighting the vast amount of cancer research being conducted throughout the university. 

The site, cancer.msu.edu, features the research of 95 faculty members spread across 20 departments and eight colleges.

“When we began compiling the list of faculty engaged in cancer research, it was amazing to see just how diverse and robust MSU’s cancer research program really is,” said Jeff MacKeigan, professor and assistant dean for research in the College of Human Medicine, who oversaw the project. 

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image of jose teixera

Uterine fibroid tumors are the leading cause of hysterectomies in the U.S., yet little is known about what causes them. A new study, however, has taken researchers one step closer to understanding how these tumors develop and grow.

Researchers at Michigan State University College of Human Medicine, Van Andel Institute and Spectrum Health have uncovered new information about the genes associated with the tumors — a breakthrough that may lead to better treatments that could help many women avoid surgery.

“This study could not have been done without that collaboration,” said Jose Teixeira, who proposed the research and who is a professor in the Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology.

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rare disease day symposium logo

Michigan State University College of Human Medicine is collaborating with Helen DeVos Children’s Hospital and Calvin University to host the Rare Disease Day Symposium on February 29, 2020.

We have generous support for this event from the College of Human Medicine, the Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, and the Department of Pediatrics and Human Development.

One in 10 people in the United States has a rare disease. Students, faculty and staff are invited to attend this free event that brings together patients, caregivers, researchers and advocates in the rare disease community. Sessions include talks from a scientist studying rare diseases, a medical geneticist and patients with various rare disease diagnoses, and other scientific breakouts.

spectrum building

GRAND RAPIDS, MI – Too many women with uterine fibroids end up getting hysterectomies.

Researchers at the Michigan State University College of Human Medicine, Van Andel Institute (VAI) and Spectrum Health have uncovered new information in a study that could help many women avoid surgery.

Approximately 600,000 women have a hysterectomy each year in the United States and half are because of non-cancerous tumors of the uterus – uterine fibroids, according to Jose Teixeira, a professor in the Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology in the College of Human Medicine at Michigan State University.

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asgi fazleabas

The Society For The Study Of Reproduction, or SSR, unveiled its 2020 award winners honoring seven individuals from some of the most prestigious universities in the world who have made outstanding contributions to the scientific discipline of reproductive biology.

MSU University Distinguished Professor and associate chair of research Asgi Fazleabas, from the Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology in the College of Human Medicine, was honored with the Carl Hartmann Award, which is the highest award given by the SSR. The award recognizes a career of research and scholarly activities in the field of reproductive biology.

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opiates

Michigan, indeed, our entire country, has been in the throes of the worst national drug epidemic in North America. American deaths attributed to opiates and fentanyl have outpaced the mortality rates experienced in every war since World War II combined and continue to climb annually. 

Politicians and policymakers have been largely befuddled on how best to address this disease, which largely originated from legal pharmaceuticals and has since been exacerbated by the sharp increase in cheap heroin and deadly illicitly manufactured fentanyl. 

No other nation in the world is being confronted with such a deadly health crisis. The costs of this epidemic has been estimated by economists to be as high as $1.5 trillion dollars. These costs are attributable to (A) lost productivity to employers, (B) vanished tax revenues to state and local governments, (C) medical interventions for these patients (particularly in our emergency rooms) and (D) increased costs related to growing criminal justice interventions.

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Jake Reske Image

Jake Reske is a graduate student at Michigan State University’s biomedical research center in Grand Rapids. He studies Genetics and Genome Sciences in the department of Obstetrics, Gynecology & Reproductive Biology (OBGYN) and works under Dr. Ronald Chandler.

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